The Grammar Belle

Spiffing y'all up, one typo at a time

Here, There, and Everywhere

Hey, y’all. THERE’s a problem I need to chat with my coworkers about. But, instead of being a bossy grammar fiend, I’ll just write a blog post about it and pray they all read it. (Hey there, sweet coworkers! Hugs to you all.)

So, HERE goes.

CRINGE 10 bonus points if you can tell me what’s wrong with that sentence. 25 bonus points + my undying love and admiration if you can diagram it and/or label the parts of speech.

CRINGE
10 bonus points if you can tell me what’s wrong with that sentence. 25 bonus points + my undying love and admiration if you can diagram it and/or label the parts of speech.

HERE’s the problem: We have a basic matter of subject/verb disagreement. You know, when the person or thing doing the action doesn’t jibe with the action word. Your ears know THERE’s an issue with “The papers is on the floor” or “The copier are broken.” That, my sweet readers, is a basic subject/verb disagreement.

Gotta love a good pop quiz.

Gotta love a good pop quiz.

I bet you got an A+ on that, didn’t you? So why, when “here” and “there” get in the mix, is it so easy to forget the most basic points of English grammar? I think it’s because of the inverted word order. English typically likes things arranged with the subject before the verb. Typically.

Inverted Word Order 101

Inverted Word Order 101

Don’t let the adverb coming first throw out all you’ve ever known and loved about subject/verb agreement. Of course, that first email should have read: Here are the files for you to review. Just remember to look at the actual subject of the sentence (in this case, “files”) and use “is” or “are” or one of the contractions appropriately.

A blogger can dream . . .

A blogger can dream . . .

Now get on out there and be agreeable, OK? And will someone please forward this blog post to all of my coworkers? Thanks a bunch.
TGB Sig

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7 comments on “Here, There, and Everywhere

  1. addude13
    February 6, 2013

    The sports team thing is weird too. I’ve seen Euro-style writings like “Liverpool are considering a contract offer to the goalkeeper.”

    • The Grammar Belle
      February 6, 2013

      The Brits are much more conscientious about whether a group is acting as a whole or as individuals (hence sing. vs. plural verb). We don’t seem to care that much on this side . . .

  2. peggy
    February 6, 2013

    Ah, yes. This is a pet peeve of mine, as well. This is lifted from this morning’s newspaper’s on-line article, “Several Medicaid reform bills was filed Tuesday as lawmakers await release of a special audit of the government health care program.” It just makes me crazy……..

    • The Grammar Belle
      February 6, 2013

      Everyone just needs to slow down a bit. And self-edit. 🙂 Thanks for reading, Peggy! See you soon.

  3. outlawmama
    February 6, 2013

    Finally, a grammar issue I could understand and nail perfectly. Well done!

  4. The Grammar Belle
    February 7, 2013

    FINALLY! 😉 Thanks for stopping by for a read.

  5. Pingback: A Year of Grammar Goodies (With Bonus Pop Quiz) | The Grammar Belle

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